Policy and Frame Work to Achieve Sustainable livelihood

In qualitative, sustainable development production replaces depreciated assets, and births replace deaths so that stocks of wealth and people are continually renewed and even improved. (Daily, 1990).Sustainable development must be inclusive and pay particular attention to the needs of the poorest and most vulnerable. Strategies need to be creative, action-oriented and collaborative, and adapt to multiple growth levels involving systemic changes in consumption and production patterns and could lead, inter alia, to substantial price (UNDESA, 2013). The Inclusive Economy provides a truly democratic conceptual framework in which social benefits arising from and flowing into economic activity are given greater consideration of aligning with modern forms of economic democracy, new municipalities and the creation of local resources (Burch and Melnroy, 2018). The first pillar encompasses four main indicators of economic growth and development: GDP per capita; labor productivity, which underpins wages, which in turn accounts for the overwhelming majority of household income; jobs, a proxy for broad economic opportunities and ultimately family security; and healthy life expectancy, a measure of quality of life (Hanouz and Corrigan, 2017) Most importantly, the processes and results are the most important examples of community development and economic development.
According the Department of Community and Enterprise Cavan council, 2009 social inclusion is a series of positive actions to achieve equality of access to goods and services, to assist all individuals participate in their community and society, to encourage the contribution of all persons to social and cultural life and to be aware of, and to challenge, all forms of discrimination)
To achieve this, it is necessary to create a sustainable and resource-efficient economy based on a fair and just society that respects the ecological limits and the natural environment\'s capacity.


On 25 September 2015, all 193 United Nations (UN) the Member States unanimously adopted the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development with the 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) which placed sustainable development as the core principle of global cooperation and national development (UN, 2015), The Sustainable Livelihoods approach is a framework that incorporates concepts of assets, capabilities and entitlements in recent analytical work around this issue. Here livelihoods are commonly defined as comprising the capabilities, assets (including both material and social resources) and activities required for a means of living. A livelihood is identified as sustainable when it can cope with and recover from stresses and shocks and maintain or enhance capabilities and assets both now and in the future, while not undermining the natural resource base (Chambers and Conway 1992, Carney 1998). Social integration is a highly desirable outcome that represents the presence of social cohesion, a solid institutional base and acceptance culture. Societies are better off by promoting social inclusion through progressive policies that reduce economic inequality and poverty and encourage sustainable and equitable growth (Crus-Saco, 2008). Mahatma Gandhi has said, \"Earth provides enough to satisfy every man\'s need, but not every man\'s greed.\" Earth had enormous resources to meet our needs. The only reason we run on a resource deficit is that we have not kept our covetousness under control. We allowed our population to grow at a rate that could not be sustained by nature. At the same time, we allowed our consumption of resources per capita to rise rapidly. We treat natural resources as a gift to make things worse. Our efforts focused solely on how to get it back quickly and at minimal cost to us, regardless of the impact it might have on others or future generations generation (Hameed A,2018). Sustainable society could easily be created by eliminating racism, brutality, social discrimination, and human deprivation, poverty, socio-cultural barriers, and ecological destabilization. (Hameed, 2018).\n\nThe role of community in sustainable development has caused excitement and confusion in almost equal measure amongst participation and policymakers over recent years, particularly since the UN conference on environment and development in the Rio in 1992 (Warburton,1998) In closed research Paulsson,2017, communities have their capitals to contribute their resource to local economic development and they have also their own cultural and behavioural resources of interface with their immediate nature and nurture and frameworks to achieve inclusive economy.
Therefore, transformations to sustainable development imply deep structural changes, profound reforms of institutions, shifting mental maps and norms, changing patterns of human behaviour, widespread awareness-raising and mobilization, the adoption of a complex adaptive systems approach to sustainability issues, and unprecedented problem solving (Twi2050, 2018).
The 2030 Agenda is both a normative orientation and a guide for action. It identifies and pursues development priorities while requiring coherence among all policy areas and sectors, at the local, regional, national and transnational level (Global Sustainable Development Report 2019)The transformation of assets into a sustainable livelihood strategy consisting of a portfolio of income-generating activities is realized through the mediation of Institutions and organizations (Pons, 2014) Organizations are associations with common objectives; they are the hardware, while institutions are the software. .Livelihood approaches and results are not only dependent on access to capital assets or restricted by the vulnerability context; they are also transformed by the structures (Serrat, 2017). Structures are public and private sector organizations setting and enforcing policies and legislation; providing services; and purchasing, selling, and performing all other function. Sustainable financing needs to be provided across industries, including agriculture, forestry, energy, health and education, as well as across economic segments, such as small and medium-sized enterprises, infrastructure and innovation, both in national and regional level UN/EDC2013). The quality of social life depends on a wide range of environmental, cultural, economic and political factors, whose measurement represents a fundamental challenge for understanding their role and for devising proper policies (Lombaerde and Laparde, 2007). Governments should think beyond the constraints of short-term, political timeframes when formulating economic policy. Longer-term thinking must be secured and ensured by the continuity of government policy, which seeks to protect the planet and people (Patel and Gibbon, 2017).
Combining and aligning visions of local, national, and global common welfare making policy relationship between state and non-state actors, respect the rule of law, are accountable to their people and administer justice equally; non-state organizations are involved proactively and are part of the governance system at the core of SDG 16 (rule of law, absence of corruption) and SDG 17 (global cooperation and partnerships for the SDGs) and explicitly addressed in other SDGs such as SDG10 social and political equality and gender equality(TWI2025, 2018).
World Bank evaluations suggest that \"the best hope for promoting growth and reducing poverty\" comes from an \"integrated approach that combines macroeconomic stabilization and structural adjustment with appropriately tailored public expenditure in social sectors, mechanisms to upgrade skills and institution capabilities, and safety-net policies offer\" (Jayarajah 1996). Economic development can advance social development, particularly through well-designed education and communication systems that build social cohesion and mobility.