The Benefits of UPS VRLA Batteries

The Elite VRLA (sealed) UPS battery range is specifically designed and manufactured for high rate applications when high power density is required in a small footprint. This battery is available in a 3 to 5-year design life and a 6 or 10-year design life.
The ELITE high rate battery is covered by a 12-month replacement guarantee from the date of dispatch from our workshop in Johannesburg.
This battery uses the well-proven absorbed glass matt technology known as AGM. With its specially designed valve, it forces any gasses generated by the battery back into liquid form in the Electrolyte, i.e. battery acid water, thereby making this battery a very low maintenance product.
Unlike other battery technologies such as Lithium-based products and Nickel/Cadmium as well as many other technologies which contain poisonous substances and are not recyclable here in Africa, the Elite range is easily recycled at various battery recycling facilities in Africa and does not need to be dumped into landfills like other dangerously poisonous battery products.
There is a misunderstanding amongst average battery users that the design life is the guarantee life. The design life is the expected time that a battery will give service for during its use. This usage time is dependent on many factors such as how often the battery is discharged, how deeply the amount of available capacity is removed on any discharge, the operational environment (in particular temperature), and the quality of the battery charger being used to charge the battery, all affect how long it will give reliable service.
A particular misunderstanding amongst the average user arises when a battery is discharged every day, like in the event of rolling blackouts.
To explain how a battery’s discharge and recharge works we will use the analogy of a water tank: \nImagine a water tank with one 5mm inlet filler tap – this is like the battery charger – and one 20mm outlet tap – this is like the supply to the battery’s load. When a battery discharges for say 4 hours, it would be like the big outlet tap being opened, and after 4 hours you only have 20% of the water left.
Because the filler tap is smaller, it cannot fill the tank sufficiently by the next discharge, so when the next blackout comes the tank is not full to start with, so it will drain to only 5% capacity left.
Bearing this analogy in mind, you cannot simply recharge a battery at any amps, so only a limited amount of power is put back by the next day. With the result being, like the water tank, the battery gets less and less charge after each daily blackout and eventually starts delivering shorter backup time after a few days. There is nothing wrong with the battery; it just isn’t getting enough charge to get full.
A lead-acid battery will take about 72 hours before it is 100% full. So the question is, how do you ensure that the battery is full by the next day if it is forced to discharge every day? The answer is simple; the battery should be sized so that each day you only take out the amount of power that can be put back in 24 hours.
This is called Cyclic Application and is a very specific way of sizing a battery backup bank. Normally batteries are only sized to do an occasional discharge, for example, once a week or month or once every 6 months; this is called a Float Application.
Remember each time you use a battery a little bit of it is lost. So the more often you discharge a battery, and the amount of capacity you take out at each discharge, the less usage life you will get. For example, if you discharge a cyclic battery application every day, it will not give you its design life and could be finished in less than 12 months. This is not covered by a battery warranty as it is used up.