Comparing Water Quality in Natural and Artificial Bodies

The multiple experiments conducted were various tests concerning the water quality of water from a koi pond that was shielded from the natural environment and the water quality of water from a river exposed to the environment. The water was tested for amounts of dissolved oxygen, phosphate, nitrite, nitrate, pH levels, and for temperature. This was done at Cambrian International Academy, in the science lab with pre-made tests for specific chemicals and elements. These tests are extremely important to the owners of the koi pond and the river due to the fact that there could be dangerous levels of a substance that threatens the organisms living in and around the body of water.

The results of these experiments can be presented to the owners of the koi pond and the river. If any of the bodies of water were found to contain dangerous amounts of the substances that they were tested for, the necessary precautions could be taken and the organisms living in and around the body of water could be saved.

In an article about agriculture from the government of Alberta, it was stated “testing the water allows a knowledgeable approach to address the specific problems of a water supply.” Before testing the water quality, a hypothesis was made. The hypothesis was that the river water would have higher pH levels, dissolved oxygen levels, nitrate levels, nitrite levels, phosphate levels and a higher temperature due to the fact that the river water is more exposed to the environment and is, therefore, more exposed to the biogeochemical cycles that might result in higher levels of the specific elements.

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To test the water quality of both the koi pond and the river, the first thing to do was to collect samples. A bucket of water from the koi pond and from the river were collected and measured. Then, four teams proceeded to collect one five milliliter sample from both of the samples (see figure 1). The four teams used premade API tests to test the samples of water for pH levels, nitrate levels, nitrite levels, phosphate levels, dissolved oxygen, and used a thermometer to check the temperature.

The API tests included a solution that could label the specific element with a specific color and included a color chart that had the amounts of the element correlating to the color of the water once the solution was put inside of the sample. A test tube like the one used to measure the samples of water In the end, six tests were completed. Temperature, dissolved oxygen levels, phosphate levels, nitrite levels, nitrate levels, and pH levels. The results of these tests are recorded in figure 2, the table below. As you can see, the koi pond had a higher pH level than the river. The river has a higher nitrate level than the koi pond. Both have no nitrite at all. The river has a higher phosphate level than the koi pond. Both the river and the koi pond have the same dissolved oxygen level as well. The temperature of the river is one degree celsius higher than the koi pond.

To conclude, the hypothesis was partly correct because most of the tests showed the river containing higher levels of the elements, but the koi pond and the river had the same amount of nitrite and dissolved oxygen. One theory is that the river had more nitrates, phosphorus, and higher dissolved oxygen levels due to the fact that the river is more exposed to the nitrogen cycle, phosphorus cycle, oxygen cycle, and the natural environment. One surprising aspect of the results is the phosphate levels. The safe phosphate level is 0.1, although both the river and the koi pond had more. Possibly because of the massive rainstorm that occurred last week, the week of January 21. The rain could’ve eroded the phosphorus rich rocks and that may have contributed to the high amount of phosphorus in the water.

The dissolved oxygen test results were the least surprising; the safe dissolved oxygen level is 5-12 ppm and both bodies of water were at a safe 12 ppm. The experiments were, ultimately, successful although there were a few errors. One being that one of the groups, the group in charge of testing phosphate, didn’t read the instructions properly and had to redo the experiment. There may be a chance that the phosphate group didn’t read the instructions properly and the phosphate test results may be incorrect. Another error was the fact that one of the groups spilled their sample of river water and had to redo their experiment as well. To summarize, the experiment could have been done better, although, the experiments were successful and the correct data was collected.

References

  1. Alberta Government, Department of Agriculture and Forestry, Trade and Environment Division, Irrigation and Farm Water Branch. (2019, January 03).
  2. Water Analysis Interpretation for Livestock. Retrieved from
  3. https://www1.agric.gov.ab.ca/$department/deptdocs.nsf/all/agdex718
  4. Department of Agriculture and Forestry, (n.d.). Retrieved from
  5. https://www.alberta.ca/ministry-agriculture-forestry.aspx
  6. Government of Alberta; Agriculture and Forestry Water Quality. (n.d.). Retrieved from
  7. https://www.agric.gov.ab.ca/app21/infopage?cat1=Soil/Water/Air&cat2=Water Quality
  8. Heinonen, P. (n.d.). Water Quality Classification in Finland. Water Quality Measurements Water Quality Measurements Series, 345-350. doi:10.1002/9780470511121.ch29
  9. Institute, I. W. (2010). Water quality: Why land management matters. doi:10.5337/2010.216
  10. Webbers, A. (1995). Ground-water quality protection; why it’s important to you. Open-File Report. doi:10.3133/ofr95376

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Comparing Water Quality in Natural and Artificial Bodies. (2022, Apr 26). Retrieved from http://envrexperts.com/free-essays/essay-about-comparing-water-quality-in-natural-and-artificial-bodies

Comparing Water Quality in Natural and Artificial Bodies
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